RESERVATIONSBEST RATE GUARANTEED

RESERVATIONS

BEST RATE GUARANTEED

Select Hotel
Check-in
YY/MM/DD
Check-out
YY/MM/DD
Adults
Children(Age7-11)
Children(Age0-6)
People

BEST RATE GUARANTEED

BEST RATE GUARANTEED

Close

What’s Happening at Asahikawa

ASAHIDAKE Autumn

ASAHIDAKE Autumn

ASAHIDAKE, where alpine plants turn an autumn red and volcanic smoke rises into the sky

ADAHIDKA in the autumn

Mt. Asahidake is the highest peak of the Daisetsu Mountains, which include Mt. Kurodake and Mt. Akadake.
As the highest peak in Hokkaido Prefecture, many tourists and mountain climbers visit each from all over the country.
Popular for that alone, Mt. Asahidake is also known as the spot which gets its autumn leaves earliest in Japan.
*The leaves usually begin to change color around late August and reach peak viewing between mid September to early October.

You can ride the Asahidake Ropeway to the summit.
Right next to Asahidake Onsen, you can find Base Station at a height of 1,100m. From here it is only 10 minutes to Sugatami Station, which equates to the fifth station, or halfway point of the mountain. From the cable car window, you can look out over a blanket of trees dyed red and yellow. Come and make the most of the magnificent nature of Mt. Asahidake, known as Kamui Mintara (the garden where gods play) in the Ainu language.
This is the only ropeway in Japan that goes beyond the forest line and up to the high mountain range, so you can enjoy seeing the borderline from above and almost feel like you’re levitating.

You can walk to the summit from Sugatami Station.
It takes around two hours, but Sugatami Pond that you will see on the way is a must-see!
You can enjoy the incredible view of Mt. Asahidake reflected on the water surface with the blue sky and volcanic smoke rising up in the background.

Don’t forget to go and see the colored alpine plants, too.

The sight of red aleutian avens leaves and cotton fluff swaying in the autumn wind is characteristic, but you can also enjoy several other alpine plants, such as sorbus matsumurana, Erman’s birch, gaultheria miqueliana, and Korean crowberry.

The spot introduced in this article